Terminology Question

Bundled telephone and Wireline services
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Mike G
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Joined: Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:26 am
Location: Sydney

Terminology Question

Post by Mike G » Wed Aug 01, 2012 3:59 pm

Hi Guys,

I have a problem with my telephone landline service, the house telephone connection point does not give a dial tone. In trying to get service from Exetel they refer to a charge if the line is ok at the Network Boundary Point. Where and what is the Network Boundary Point? Is it the connector where the main line comes into the house?

Mike G

Dazzled
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Re: Terminology Question

Post by Dazzled » Wed Aug 01, 2012 6:15 pm

Yes, but the location varies from residence to residence. It is the point where Telstra-owned cabling stops, and private cabling and equipment begin. The private part is the owner's responsibility, which is why isolation testing is important.

In older houses, built when Telstra's ancestor the Postmaster General even owned the handsets, it is the phone (wall or skirting) outlet nearest the street. In more modern houses it might be an external plastic NTD box on or very near the front wall, where the incoming line terminates. You can also have a small box near the eaves if the incoming cabling is aerial, as in less built-up areas, or on the front wall, with the boundary at the first phone. In flats and similar buildings the network boundary is the main distribution frame, usually in a ground floor locked location accessible to the incoming cables. Cabling from the MDF to each flat or strata unit is private, owned by the owners' corporation.

Here's a picture of a modern NTD box--
Attachments
ntd.png
ntd
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Mike G
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:26 am
Location: Sydney

Re: Terminology Question

Post by Mike G » Wed Aug 01, 2012 8:13 pm

Thanx for the quick reply. I think there is such a box. Do I understand you correctly though that the line is only covered to the box and not from it? That is the cabling from the box to the single telephone socket is my responsiblity. I have tested the socket with multiple phones and also a multimeter. I have no dial tone and no voltage shown. Is there something else involved in an isolation test?

Mike G

Mike G
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:26 am
Location: Sydney

Re: Terminology Question

Post by Mike G » Wed Aug 01, 2012 8:20 pm

I maybe should add that both the box and the socket were installed by Telstra when the line was installed less than two years ago. From memory the box didn't look like something I should be tampering with.

Mike G

Dazzled
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Posts: 6003
Joined: Mon Nov 13, 2006 1:16 pm
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Re: Terminology Question

Post by Dazzled » Wed Aug 01, 2012 9:34 pm

If it matches the pic above (about 300mm square) it's a recent NTD, and is the network boundary. If opened there are two compartments, and the telco side is verboten. The open side is for your licensed cabler to make connections, and all your points may be fed from here.

See http://www.telstra.com.au/smart-communi ... s-0609.pdf

Whatever kind of boundary you have, every cable and fitting after it is yours, and you have to fix it. The telco tests and fixes its side. Telstra has the no-fault fee (Exetel passes it on) to discourage people using their people to locate what are really private side faults, or even worse, computer and modem troubles. Something as simple as running a modem or phone as close to the boundary as possible, with everything else unplugged detects almost all internal faults.

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