Red Tailed Phascogale Updates

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Red Tailed Phascogale Updates

Post by ForumAdmin » Tue Jun 24, 2008 8:04 pm

Progress Report - June 2008

Reintroduction of Red-tailed Phascogale to Wadderin Sanctuary in the central wheatbelt of Western Australia.

Activity to date revolves around preparing the Wadderin Sanctuary for the reintroduction of the Red-tailed Phascogale. This requires ensuring the integrity of the fence, ensuring the site is predator-free, conducting base-line surveys to establish what native and pest species are currently within the Sanctuary and what resources are available for Phascogale, and applying for necessary licences to conduct the translocation from the regulatory authority. A brief summary of activities is given below:

Preparation for reintroduction

Fence construction, inspection and maintenance

The 11.5 km fence was completed early in 2008. There was some major localised damage to the fence in May following 90 mm of rainfall in 1½ hours causing a major torrent of water to undermine a 50 m length of the fence. This allowed foxes to briefly regain entry to the site. This fence was repaired by community volunteers.
The fence is checked weekly to ensure its integrity by a community member. WR&M staff also check the fence on field trips and identify any potential problem areas requiring attention and remedy any areas of weakness.
Predator control and monitoring
Victor soft-catch foot-hold traps were used in conjunction with baiting in the months following completion of the fence to ensure total removal of predators. At this early stage resident foxes were digging under the fence, despite the wire skirt extending out from the fence. One fox was caught in a trap set in a runway under the fence.
Community members regularly bait for foxes within the Sanctuary by use of tethered and buried meat baits around the perimeter fence. These bait stations are checked regularly for any sign of activity or loss of baits. Checking occurred daily in the first week of baiting but has now reduced to weekly. Large numbers of baits are taken in the first week of baiting and then this rapidly tails away to none.
The perimeter track (a graded line) is checked at the same time for any evidence of predator tracks. In addition, internal tracks are also driven slowly in search of tracks and supplemented with regular searches on foot. Community members identified the need for a 4-wheel motorbike to facilitate fence checking and checking for predator tracks. WR&M worked with the Shire to obtain funding though the local catchment council to fund this purchase. This is soon to arrive and should improve the efficiency of monitoring.
Spotlighting is conducted regularly by WR&M staff to confirm the absence of predators within the reserve and to provide baseline data on the presence of other species within the Sanctuary. This is particularly important to detect the more cryptic feral cats. No predators have been detected within the Sanctuary during spotlighting.

Complete regulatory requirements to permit reintroduction

A detailed translocation proposal was submitted to the Department of Conservation and Environment in early May 2008. Comments were received back on this proposal in late June with a request for letters of support from the private property owners from which phascogale will be taken and from the leasor of the Wadderin reserve (the Water Authority). Approvals are taking far longer than anticipated and will mean that it is unlikely Phascogale can be shifted this year before the male die-off in July. Hence, we will be hoping to shift newly pregnant females in August and early September or newly independent males and females in January 2009.

Identify a source or sources of Phascogale for transfer

We have identified three source sites on private land (to the north and west of Wagin) and one on public land (Tutanning NR, east of Pingelly). All these sites have been trapped in the past 1-2 years and are known to have high-density populations. We are currently obtaining formal permission from the landowners to remove a small number of Phascogale from each site.
Establish nest boxes for Phascogale prior to release
Twelve nest boxes for phascogale have been constructed (with a further eight to come). These were made by a community volunteer and have been erected in trees in areas of favourable habitat within the Sanctuary by WR&M. These are to supplement existing tree hollows. Phascogale will be released into these boxes when they are transferred to Wadderin Sanctuary. They are likely to be particularly important for females with young as they provide a secure nesting site (a dense filling of wool for insulation of the litter, and security from nest predators and nest competitors).
Implement a community reporting scheme
Posters were placed in prominent public places in the wheatbelt towns of Narembeen, Bruce Rock, Kondinin, Kulin, and Corrigin requesting any information on sightings of phascogale and as part of an effort to raise public awareness of Phascogale in the region. These towns are in heavily cleared agricultural areas on the northern margin of the current known range of red-tailed phascogale.
To date, these posters have elicited two sightings – one to the east of Corrigin and one to the north-east of Hyden. The latter, in particular, is a significant sighting as it will extend the current known range of the species to the north-east and is the only sighting in the central wheatbelt since the 1970 surveys by the WA Museum. Trapping by CALM (DEC) in recent years have not been successful in locating Phascogale in the key remaining reserves in this part of the wheatbelt (Bendering NR, North Karlgarin NR, and Dragon Rocks NR). We hope to trap the Hyden site in the coming months to confirm the presence of phascogale.
The generally low rate of sightings confirms our expectation that Phascogale are largely absent from the central wheatbelt.

Baseline Surveys

A baseline survey using Elliott and cage traps (200 trap nights in total) was conducted. The only mammal caught was a Black Rat Rattus rattus, a species not previously recorded in the Sanctuary. This was caught at the base of a granite outcrop.
Native mammal species observed in the Sanctuary are echidna, euro, and western grey kangaroo. Several brush-tailed possums have been reportedly released in the Sanctuary in recent years (re-located from wheat bins) but we have found no evidence of their continued presence.
In addition, broad vegetation communities, the road network, and fence lines have been mapped and transferred onto a GIS. The availability of tree hollows (a key resource for phascogale and other hollow-nesting species) was assessed also. The presence/absence of hollows was determined for > 170 trees and large shrubs. York gum Eucalyptus loxophleba and salmon gum E. salmonophloia were the species with highest incidence (> 50%) of hollows. Areas of dense Rock She-oak (Allocasuarina heugeli) around the margins of granite outcrops are likely to be important foraging areas for phascogale. There are also areas of dense broombush Melaleuca uncinata / tamma bush Allocasuarina spp. associated with Mallee/shrubland habitat that may also be important.

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Re: Wadderin Sanctuary Updates

Post by ForumAdmin » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:55 pm

Progress Report to Exetel - September 2008

Reintroduction of Red-tailed Phascogale to Wadderin Sanctuary in the central wheatbelt of Western Australia.

Activity to date revolves around preparing the Wadderin Sanctuary for the reintroduction of the Red-tailed Phascogale. This requires ensuring the integrity of the fence, ensuring the site is predator-free, conducting base-line surveys to establish what native and pest species are currently within the Sanctuary and what resources are available for Phascogale, and applying for necessary licences to conduct the translocation from the regulatory authority. A brief summary of activities in the July to September 2008 period is given below.

Preparation for reintroduction


Fence construction, inspection and maintenance


The fence is checked weekly to ensure its integrity by community member Brian Price. WR&M staff check the fence on field trips, identify any potential problem areas requiring attention; remedy any areas of weakness where possible, and report back to community members any larger issues requiring attention.
No damage to the fence has been reported during this reporting period.
A Wadderin Wildlife Sanctuary ‘Closing of the Fence’ celebration is to be held on the afternoon of 26th September for all those involved in fence construction and other interested parties. Invitees include the Water Authority (the lease and provider of waterpipe as fence strainers), Department of Corrective Services (prisoners played an important role in fence construction), Western Power (dug strainer hole posts using their machinery), Department of Environment and Conservation (the regulator), Avon Catchment Council (a potential funder), Australian Wildlife Conservancy, WA Naturalist Club, Edith Cowan University, and the community of Narembeen, particularly the immediate neighbours to the Sanctuary.


Predator control and monitoring


Community members bait for foxes within the Sanctuary by use of tethered and buried meat baits around the perimeter fence. These bait stations are checked weekly for any sign of activity or loss of baits. There has been no bait loss this period (i.e. no fox incursions).
The perimeter track (a graded line) is checked at the same time for any evidence of predator tracks. In addition, internal tracks are also driven slowly in search of tracks and supplemented with regular searches on foot. Community members identified the need for a 4-wheel motorbike to facilitate fence checking and checking for predator tracks. WR&M worked with the Shire to obtain funding though the local catchment council (Avon Catchment Council) to fund this purchase.

The quad bike will be delivered at the “Closing of the Fence’ ceremony. A trailer (funded through matching funds from Council) is currently under construction. This will allow the bike to be transported by road and can also be towed behind the bike. The bike and trailer should greatly improve the efficiency of monitoring.

Spotlighting is conducted regularly by WR&M staff to confirm the absence of predators within the reserve and to provide baseline data on the presence of other species within the Sanctuary. This is particularly important to detect the more cryptic feral cats. A cat was sighted within the Sanctuary during spotlighting during this reporting period and a trapping program is being instigated.
The Water Authority has been approached to allow us to construct a vehicle ramp over two water pipes that cross the boundary of the Sanctuary. The ramps will allow a circumnavigation of the Sanctuary by vehicle and improve efficiency of fence checking, spotlighting, and predator management. This task is scheduled for the last week in September.

Complete regulatory requirements to permit reintroduction

There have been significant and frustrating delays in obtaining regulatory approvals.

A detailed translocation proposal was submitted to the Department of Conservation and Environment in early May 2008. Comments were received back on this proposal in late June with a request for letters of support from the private property owners from which phascogale will be taken and from the leasor of the Wadderin reserve (the Water Authority). Letters of support from landholders were obtained, but a letter from the Water Authority has proved remarkably difficult to source. This task has been pursued by the CEO of the Shire of Narembeen (the lease-holder) but is yet to be successful. The ‘Opening of the Fence’ ceremony on September 26th will be a good opportunity to pursue this in person with Water Authority representatives.

Translocation of Phascogale has been postponed to mid-summer (February 2009) to coincide with the independence of the young of the year of the current breeding season. This will allow newly independent males and females to be translocated.

An Environmental Management Plan was completed for the Wadderin Sanctuary in September by Edith Cowan University with significant input from Wildlife Research and Management. This Plan is a requirement of the lease with the Water Authority, but will prove a valuable document to formalise and solidify management arrangements and be a valuable resource in that it compiles much of the available environmental data such as plant species lists.
WR&M has also produced a 9-page document “Wadderin Sanctuary - Plan for Reintroduction of Threatened Fauna (2008 – 2012)” to provide strategic guidance to the community and to the Department of Environment and Conservation on a ‘wish list’ of species to be translocated to Wadderin. This document was produced in response to a request from the Department of Environment and Conservation. This lists, in order of priority, the following species for translocation: red-tailed phascogale, mala (rufous hare-wallaby), western barred bandicoot, burrowing bettong, brush wallaby, and brush-tailed possum. This list includes three species list as ‘endangered’ at the national level, one listed as ‘vulnerable’, and a species that has a priority at the State level.

In an attempt to build some momentum for fauna translocations to Wadderin Sanctuary (and mindful of the long delays with approvals), we have also submitted a proposal to the Department of Environment and Conservation to translocate mala (rufous hare-wallaby Lagorchestes hirsutus) to the Sanctuary from captive populations at Dryandra Forest and Peron Captive Breeding Facility at Shark Bay. There has been no successful mainland reintroduction of this species to date in Western Australia. This proposal is currently unfunded.
Identify a source or sources of Phascogale for transfer

We have identified three source sites on private land (to the north and west of Wagin) and one on public land (Tutanning NR, east of Pingelly). All these sites have been trapped in the past 1-2 years and are known to have high-density populations. We have obtained formal permission from the landowners to remove a small number of Phascogale from each site.
In addition, we plan to trap for Phascogale at Hyden where community members have reported their presence (via our community reporting scheme). If possible, we will source at least some animals from here as this area has more similar climate and vegetation to Wadderin (other known sites are from areas of considerably higher rainfall).

Establish nest boxes for Phascogale prior to release

Twenty four nest boxes for phascogale have been constructed by community volunteers at Wagin (Arthur Kershaw) and Narembeen (Tim Coveley). Eighteen have been erected in trees to date in areas of favourable habitat within the Sanctuary by WR&M and a GPS location taken. They are partly filled with wood shavings and wool for insulation and nesting. The nest boxes will supplement existing tree hollows, providing security from nest predators and nest competitors. The small entrance hollow and large internal area of the boxes make them favourable to Phascogale, but exclude other species such as galahs, ring-neck parrots, and pythons. Phascogale will be released into these boxes when they are transferred to Wadderin Sanctuary.

Other management issues


Rabbits are scarce within the Sanctuary but may become a significant management issue now that predators have been removed. WR&M has conducted extensive searches for warrens and mapped these for subsequent control actions. A community member has followed up with the poison Phostoxin to try and reduce the population as much as possible. These actions will be repeated over the course of the next 12 months to gain maximum impact (this management action will be precluded once burrowing bettongs are reintroduced).
WR&M have also completed an accurate map of the Sanctuary and its features and landforms using GPS and GIS. This is a basic resource that will facilitate management and communications.

Community meetings and community records


A meeting of community members is held quarterly to discuss issues and plan future actions. WR&M staff typically attend these meetings to provide input and guidance.
We have significantly raised the profile of Phascogale in the local community and the interest of local farmers. This is resulting in the reporting by farmers of sightings of fauna that could be Phascogale. We are compiling these sightings and will follow up with trapping after the breeding season. These sightings are substantially beyond the current know range of the species and will be important records if they can be verified.

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Re: Wadderin Sanctuary Updates

Post by ForumAdmin » Wed Dec 17, 2008 12:16 pm

Progress Report to Exetel- December 2008

Reintroduction of Red-tailed Phascogale to Wadderin Sanctuary in the central wheatbelt of Western Australia.

The December quarter was relatively quiet as we continue to await approvals from Department of Environment and Conservation and wait for the end of the Phascogale breeding season before trapping for this species can commence. WR&M conducted two trips to Narembeen during the quarter focused on ensuring the Sanctuary was predator-free and the fence was in good shape. A brief summary of activities in the October to December 2008 period is given below.

Preparation for reintroduction


Fence construction, inspection and maintenance

The fence is checked weekly to ensure its integrity by community members Brian Price and Mel Bristow. WR&M staff inspect the fence on each trip to complement the activity of community members. A number of small problem areas were identified that required attention. These include gaps around gates, overhangs of gates not flush with fence overhang, holes in gates for hand entry to open and shut gate not covered, areas with a lack of Gerard staples that might allow a predator to push through, a localised rock outcrop immediately adjacent to the outside of the fence that would permit a predator to jump over, corners that need strengthening with additional overhang, old fencing material stacked against the fence by a neighbour allowing a possible step over the fence by predators, etc.
The community group held a working bee in October to resolve these issues and WR&M staff have followed up with other minor repairs as needed.

Predator control and monitoring

Community members bait for foxes within the Sanctuary by use of tethered and buried meat baits around the perimeter fence. These bait stations are checked weekly for any sign of activity or loss of baits.
The perimeter track (a graded line) is checked at the same time for any evidence of predator tracks. In addition, internal tracks are also driven slowly in search of tracks and supplemented with regular searches on foot. The new 4-wheel motorbike (funded through the Avon Catchment Council) greatly facilitates fence checking and checking for predator tracks. Vehicle ramps have been constructed over two large water pipes that cross the boundary of the Sanctuary. This allows a circumnavigation of the Sanctuary by vehicle and improves the efficiency of fence checking, spotlighting, and predator management.
A major breach of the fence occurred in this period. An animal had pushed under the netting skirt where it crossed a rock shelf and was held down by rocks. This was believed to be by a fox. Community members rebaited (without success) and trapped with Victor soft-catch traps and cage traps. However, in contrast to earlier periods when foxes were present, no baits were taken. A fox was caught in a trap on the outside of the fence, but none were caught on the inside.

WR&M staff were called in to resolve the issue. They discovered that the culprit was a very persistent echidna that was pushing the rocks aside to burrow under the netting.
Spotlighting is conducted each trip by WR&M staff to confirm the absence of predators within the reserve and to provide baseline data on the presence of other species within the Sanctuary. This is particularly important to detect the more cryptic feral cats.

Eye shine from a cat was sighted within the Sanctuary during spotlighting in September (the only sighting in six nights of spotlighting) and a follow-up trapping program was instigated by community members (about 30 trap nights). This was unsuccessful and community members were sceptical about the presence of cats as no tracks had been detected.

However, trapping by WR&M in December (115 trap nights) caught a female tabby cat of 3.95 kg. This cat was pregnant (8 kittens in utero) indicating there is more work to be done.
Spotlighting has also revealed a healthy population of Boobook owls (two families of three birds) and Tawny Frogmouths within the Sanctuary. These may be possible predators of Phascogale when they are released early next year. The other significant sighting was of a female brush-tailed possum with a young on her back. This is the first record of this species for the Sanctuary. Possums are now extremely scarce in the central wheatbelt so this is a significant sighting.

Complete regulatory requirements to permit reintroduction

A detailed translocation proposal was submitted to the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) in early May 2008. Supplementary information (letters of support from the private property owners from which phascogale will be taken, contract details between leasee (Shire of Narembeen) and from the leasor (the Water Authority), and a strategic plan detailing which species are to be reintroduced and a justification for each) has been submitted at the request of DEC.
Translocation of Phascogale is now scheduled for late summer or early autumn (February – March 2009) to coincide with the independence of the young of the year of the current breeding season. This will allow newly independent males and females to be translocated.

Establish nest boxes for Phascogale prior to release


Twenty four nest boxes for phascogale have been constructed by community volunteers at Wagin (Arthur Kershaw) and Narembeen (Tim Coveley). Eighteen have been erected in trees to date in areas of favourable habitat within the Sanctuary by WR&M and GPS locations taken. Phascogale will be released into these boxes when they are transferred to Wadderin Sanctuary.

Other management issues

Rabbits are scarce within the Sanctuary but may become a significant management issue now that predators have been removed. WR&M has conducted extensive searches for warrens and mapped these for subsequent control actions. In addition, spotlighting helps to identify where local concentrations of rabbits occur.
Some 1080 baiting of rabbits has been done by community members using a bait laying machine during this period. There will be follow up in late summer –early autumn as the hot weather reduces the available food for rabbits.

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Re: Wadderin Sanctuary Updates

Post by ForumAdmin » Mon Mar 30, 2009 11:48 am

Progress Report to Exetel and FAME - March 2009

Reintroduction of Red-tailed Phascogale to Wadderin Sanctuary in the central wheatbelt of Western Australia.


The March quarter was relatively quiet as we continue to await approvals from Department of Environment and Conservation. WR&M conducted one trip to Narembeen during the quarter focused on ensuring the Sanctuary was predator-free and the fence was in good shape; and one to Hyden in an attempt to identify a possible new population for reintroduction and to extend the range of the species into the eastern wheatbelt. A brief summary of activities in the January to March 2009 period is given below.

Preparation for reintroduction


Fence construction, inspection and maintenance


The fence is checked weekly to ensure its integrity by community members Brian Price and Mel Bristow. WR&M staff inspected the fence on each trip to complement the activity of community members. Most fence maintenance in this period was associated with echidna activity – pushing under the skirt of the fence where it crosses rock shelves. We have added additional netting to extend the width of the skirt on each side of the fence in the problem area of 200-300 m in the south-east of the Sanctuary. We also carted and placed large rocks on the edge of the skirt where it crossed rock and shovelled dirt to cover any sections of the skirt where the edge protruded and gave the opportunity for an echidna to get a nose under.

Predator control and monitoring

Regular inspection of sandy tracks by community members revealed the sudden reappearance of cat tracks in a number of sites within the Sanctuary in early March. WR&M trapped intensively using 25 cage traps over three nights but without success. No interest was taken in traps and no new tracks were detected during the trapping period.
Spotlighting over several nights also failed to reveal any sightings of predators within the Sanctuary. However, another sighting of a possum was made suggesting that the fledgling population of this species is continuing to persist.

Complete regulatory requirements to permit reintroduction

We have finally received confirmation that our translocation proposal (submitted to the Department of Environment and Conservation in early May 2008) has been approved by the Director of Nature Conservation. The licence should be in the mail within the next week or so. It has been a long and frustrating wait.
The first translocation of Phascogale is now scheduled for the week of April 6th. We will radio-collar about half of the animals and monitor by radio-telemetry, trapping and the checking of nest boxes.

Community engagement


We attended the quarterly meeting of the Wadderin Group, the community group managing the Sanctuary, held in March to report on developments, particularly predator management and an update on the date of translocation.

Survey for Phascogale at Hyden

We surveyed King Rocks Nature Reserve, to the north-east of Hyden (about 70 km east of Wadderin) and close to the rabbit-proof fence, in January 2009 for Red-tailed Phascogale. A local farmer, whose property abuts the Reserve, had reported the presence of Phascogale in response to our community publicity about the upcoming reintroduction to Wadderin and our request for community sightings.

We trapped in four areas:

a. Near the King Rock Hall on the southern side of the rock– two nights of trapping (4 lines on first night and five on second = 225 trap nights with Elliott traps plus 27 nights with cages). No captures. Habitat was excellent – areas of dense rock she-oak abutting rock and in creek line flowing south from rock. A lack of obvious nest hollows - there were areas of Salmon gum with hollows and one line was put largely through this habitat. There were no areas where the eucalypt-bearing hollows and the rock oak were together.
b. On the north-west side in an area recommended by farmer Rolf Meeking. This is a dense forest of rock she-oak – large mature trees on deep sand of creek flowing north-west from rock. This was surrounded by areas of eucalypts with open understory and areas of dense shrubland of tamma bush and broombush. There appeared to be sufficient hollows within close proximity to the rock she-oak. Habitat quality was excellent. This was trapped with 4 lines for two nights (200 trap nights with Elliott traps plus 6 trap nights with cages). No captures.
c. An area of salmon gum and gimlet was trapped immediately south of the weir on the west side of the rock (20 trap nights with Elliotts + 3 cages). No captures.
d. An area of dense rock she-oak on the south-western margin immediately east of a major dam (25 trap nights with Elliott traps plus 5 cages for no capture.

Habitat quality was excellent, but there were abundant signs of foxes, particularly in the deep sands and cool microclimate of the rock-oak sites. These appeared to be favourite denning sites for them.

Shady
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Re: Red Tailed Phascogale Updates

Post by Shady » Wed Oct 07, 2009 5:37 pm

Progress Report to FAME and Exetel - September 2009
Reintroduction of Red-tailed Phascogale to Wadderin Sanctuary in the central wheatbelt of Western Australia.

Wildlife Research and Management staff and community volunteers translocated twenty Red-tailed Phascogale to Wadderin Sanctuary in late April this year. Monitoring of translocated animals and trapping throughout the Sanctuary revealed that at least 12 individuals had survived the first month and at least eight individuals had survived for two months following their release. This was a promising result as there were likely to be more individuals alive than this that simply could not be trapped. The July to September quarter has been relatively quiet as this is the period of male die-off and female nesting. We aimed to minimise disturbance to breeding females and let them focus on the serious business of enhancing their nest and feeding to support lactation of a litter of eight young. We consider it unwise to trap during lactation as the females need to return to the nest several times during the night to feed their young and to ensure they are warm enough. Hence, we have limited monitoring to the regular checking of nest boxes, while focusing on fence maintenance and predator management.

Post-release monitoring – the checking of nest boxes
Together with community members, we inspected the 22 nest boxes twice during the three-month period. Nest box are scattered widely through the Sanctuary (see Figure 1).
Two nest boxes that had fallen from trees were replaced more securely and several others were also strengthened.
Phascogale activity was found in over half of the nest boxes in the July check. This was generally scat, but also nesting material added to the existing wool. Phascogale were observed in three boxes in the July check and one box in the September check. Hence, Phascogale are known to have survived for 6 months post-release.
One nest box, in particular, had a large amount of shredded Melaleuca bark placed on top of the wool (Figure 2). Another had much shredded rock oak bark. Females have continued to add nesting material over the season to one nest. Hence it appears that at least several litters will be raised this season. No information is available on the use of natural tree hollows for nesting.

Post-release monitoring – trapping
Intensive trapping will re-commence in late November when the young of the year will be emerging from nesting hollows. We will be attempting to establish which females have survived the translocation and how many young have been weaned. This will target the entire Sanctuary and adjoining bushland and road verges.

Predator control and monitoring
Regular monitoring of the Sanctuary for cat and/or fox tracks continues. There is no evidence for the presence of either predator within the Sanctuary.
Two cats were captured immediately outside the enclosure, during efforts to reduce predation pressure on the fence.

Reserve management
The fence is checked weekly to ensure its integrity by community members Brian Price and Mel Bristow. Wildlife Research and Management (WR&M) staff inspected the fence on each trip to complement the activity of community members. Most fence maintenance in this period continues to be associated with Echidna activity despite considerable effort to strengthen the fence skirt in areas of activity. More soil has been piled onto rocks holding the skirt down in areas of Echidna activity in an effort to completely hide the edge of the skirt and prevent them from pushing under. There were regular sightings of Echidna within the Sanctuary.

The FAME / Exetel sign was erected on the front gate of the Sanctuary.

A sighting was made of a Malleefowl within the Sanctuary – this is the first sighting of this listed Endangered species within the Sanctuary and is an encouraging sign that the Sanctuary may be recolonised naturally now that foxes are absent. Malleefowl are known from a DEC reserve about 5 kilometres to the west.

We have plans to search the entire Sanctuary for signs of rabbit activity over the next 3 months in preparation for another baiting in late summer-early autumn. The baiting earlier this year was particularly successful in reducing the presence of rabbits (generally occurring only in the odd isolated pocket) in the Sanctuary. We are keen to reduce or eliminate rabbits before ground mammals are reintroduced.

Shady
Posts: 436
Joined: Wed May 23, 2007 11:19 am

Re: Red Tailed Phascogale Updates

Post by Shady » Thu Jan 14, 2010 4:27 pm

Landscope - WA's conservation, parks and wildlife magazine - Vol. 25 No. 2 - Summer 2009-10

Download it here in PDF format: http://www.exetel.com.au/files/Landscope_Phascogale.pdf

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