NF18ACV connection drop

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sontangly
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:33 am

NF18ACV connection drop

Post by sontangly » Mon Oct 12, 2020 12:29 pm

I've experienced frequent "Clear IP addresses. PPP connection DOWN" issues in the last couple of weeks.
Some days it happened multiple times, causing Xbox games disconnected in the middle of online sessions.
Syslog has lots of these:
dhcp6s[6006]: dhcp6_ctl_authinit: failed to open /etc/dhcp6sctlkey: No such file or directory

Can anyone suggest where the problem might be?

nilushid
Admin
Posts: 1176
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2017 2:18 pm
Location: sydney

Re: NF18ACV connection drop

Post by nilushid » Mon Oct 12, 2020 1:24 pm

sontangly wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 12:29 pm
I've experienced frequent "Clear IP addresses. PPP connection DOWN" issues in the last couple of weeks.
Some days it happened multiple times, causing Xbox games disconnected in the middle of online sessions.
Syslog has lots of these:
dhcp6s[6006]: dhcp6_ctl_authinit: failed to open /etc/dhcp6sctlkey: No such file or directory

Can anyone suggest where the problem might be?
Hi

Can you please PM me your customer ID or the service number to check on this from the back end.

Thanks

Dazzled
Volunteer Site Admin
Posts: 6018
Joined: Mon Nov 13, 2006 1:16 pm
Location: Sydney

Re: NF18ACV connection drop

Post by Dazzled » Thu Oct 15, 2020 10:04 am

The PPP fault is fundamental - if down, you have lost the Exetel connection. The back end is being looked at by nilushid.


About your question concerning the router log. This is a secondary affair.

The syslog error quoted comes from the Linux OS which runs the router, to do with obtaining your IPv6 address. It is failing in this process. (The actual message means the IPv6 server in the router can't find a pass phrase record). Linux is rather verbose and logs the system prolifically, as you can see in the rest of the records.

The purpose is explained, in Wikipedia
"routers for residential networks must be configured automatically with no operator intervention. Such routers require not only an IPv6 address for use in communicating with upstream routers, but also an IPv6 prefix for use in configuring devices on the downstream side of the router. DHCPv6 prefix delegation provides a mechanism for configuring such routers."

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