Best Software For VoIP

VOIP setup and troubleshooting
bigflytiger
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Best Software For VoIP

Post by bigflytiger » Wed Oct 25, 2006 4:11 pm

the only software exetel recommanded is xten-lite,
anyone know
what are some other software used for voip? and quality?

I am using xten-lite for voip and I will give 5/10 for its audio quality

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Post by VoIP Admin » Thu Oct 26, 2006 8:52 am

All freely available softphones only support G.711, softphones that have G.729 support are paid versions.

If you are going to pay for a softphone with G.729 support i would suggest and ATA device as it is much better than sitting in front of the computer with your microphone and speakers :)

That is my thoughts anyways.

Howard
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Post by Howard » Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:24 am

There are too many variables in softphones.

The hardware that will affect the voice quility included
- sound card - most of the sound cards nowadays are build-in on board, it will interference with your harddisk, cd-rom, etc. My experience of those on-borad sound cards are bad, when my cd-rom turns, or my hdd is reading or writing, i can hear static on the headphone. The solution on this is to buy those high-end sound card with build-in filter which will filter out those interference. (but the price for those sound card is enough to buy an ATA+phone)

- head phone/speaker - some head phone with buildin mircophone, when your headphone volume is too loud, the sound the comes out from the phone will go back to the mirophone which creates echo. Same thing happen if you use a speaker. The best solution is to use a seperate mircophone and head phone when using softphone.

I agree with VOIPAdmin, the best quality to use VOIP is to use an ATA and standard phone.

bigflytiger
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Post by bigflytiger » Thu Nov 02, 2006 4:15 pm

Definitions:

Codec: A compression algorithm for your call that determines the call quality and the bandwidth required for the call. 3 compression CODECs, G.711 (least compression), G.726 (medium compression), and the default, G.729 (greatest compression). The higher the compression, the lower the quality of the call. And the higher the compression the lower the bandwidth requirements for the call.

G.711: Excellent call quality with the least compression at approximately 100Kbps bandwidth.
G.726: Very good call quality with compression at approximately 50Kbps bandwidth.
G.729: Good call quality with greatest compression at approximately 20 Kbps bandwidth.

G.729 is the default TalkSwitch CODEC.

You may experience call degradation if there is high internet traffic, or high internal networking traffic. To accommodate a larger number of simultaneous calls you may need to increase the call compression.

Michael McLaughlin
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Post by Michael McLaughlin » Sat Nov 04, 2006 7:00 am

I am using a Netcomm V300 hooked up to my NB5+4 and using a standard phone.It works perfect.Spend the extra money and buy the V300 .[I do not work for Netcomm.]And your computer does not have to be turned on.

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Post by ForumAdmin » Sat Nov 04, 2006 8:09 am

bigflytiger wrote:Definitions:

Codec: A compression algorithm for your call that determines the call quality and the bandwidth required for the call. 3 compression CODECs, G.711 (least compression), G.726 (medium compression), and the default, G.729 (greatest compression). The higher the compression, the lower the quality of the call. And the higher the compression the lower the bandwidth requirements for the call.

G.711: Excellent call quality with the least compression at approximately 100Kbps bandwidth.
G.726: Very good call quality with compression at approximately 50Kbps bandwidth.
G.729: Good call quality with greatest compression at approximately 20 Kbps bandwidth.

G.729 is the default TalkSwitch CODEC.

You may experience call degradation if there is high internet traffic, or high internal networking traffic. To accommodate a larger number of simultaneous calls you may need to increase the call compression.
Thank you for that very useful summary - we'll add it to the top ten frequently asked questions in the VoIP section.

James L
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Post by James L » Tue Oct 09, 2007 7:43 pm

G'day,
I've been really happy with the performance and support available for "SJPHONE".

4/5 for the support and design.

Has anyone else had great success with any other software?

I've been thinking of using a portable USB device, but would rather some sort of Portable software that can handle the VOIP (and remember the settings!)

I also think "Smart Dialer" is great. It has industry standard support for most of the protocols (G.723.1, G.729 and G.711 codec's).

idea's welcome!

ludditetechnologies
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X-Lite - Good Softphone

Post by ludditetechnologies » Sat Nov 24, 2007 7:00 pm

I find X-Lite excellent, tried a few and this is easy and great call quality.

http://www.counterpath.com/xlitedownload.html

karlbowden
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Post by karlbowden » Sun Jan 13, 2008 10:38 pm

I only use softphones when I need video support as I have found softphones have many variables indeed too.

I have had great success with using Ekiga for Linux, but have only used it with the ekiga.net service, not with exetel's voip service.

I have also found better call reliability if I connect my laptop via ethernet cable instead of wireless.
If Linux is not the answer, then your not asking the right question.

Jared Lee

Post by Jared Lee » Tue Mar 25, 2008 3:10 pm

I use Ekiga on linux with Exetel Voip. Work normal for me

thomas261989
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Re: Best Software For VoIP

Post by thomas261989 » Mon Aug 25, 2008 3:19 pm

What codec does xtenlite support?

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bilal
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Re:

Post by bilal » Sat Dec 06, 2008 2:09 pm

Just thought I'd add regarding the hardware interference problems - I've found that USB headsets eliminate a lot of this type of trouble, because everything's digital up to the point of the adapter/converter.

Then your issue would probably come back more to the CPU to do processing, etc, as opposed to sound interference.

I've also found USB speakers are really good for taking care of mobile phone "murmur" as well, where cheapo / unshiedled speakers' cables and enclusres behaved like radio antennas.
Howard wrote:There are too many variables in softphones.

The hardware that will affect the voice quility included
- sound card - most of the sound cards nowadays are build-in on board, it will interference with your harddisk, cd-rom, etc. My experience of those on-borad sound cards are bad, when my cd-rom turns, or my hdd is reading or writing, i can hear static on the headphone. The solution on this is to buy those high-end sound card with build-in filter which will filter out those interference. (but the price for those sound card is enough to buy an ATA+phone)

- head phone/speaker - some head phone with buildin mircophone, when your headphone volume is too loud, the sound the comes out from the phone will go back to the mirophone which creates echo. Same thing happen if you use a speaker. The best solution is to use a seperate mircophone and head phone when using softphone.

I agree with VOIPAdmin, the best quality to use VOIP is to use an ATA and standard phone.

ausnicknick
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Re: Best Software For VoIP

Post by ausnicknick » Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:10 pm

Hi I'm a newbie to Exetel and I'm trying to set up to use the VOiP. I have a desktop USB phone which is apparently compatible with SIP as well as Skype (which I was using previously). I can't find anyway though to access the settings for it in order to put the Exetel SIP settting in as per the email I received. It's a P4K model. I have uninstalled the Skypemate software that came with it but have got no further.

As a different option, I downloaded X-lite in order to use that with but don't understand all of the information it wants when I compare it with the information I have from Exetel to put into it. Anyone who has done this successfully, please help!

Third and finally I have been allocated a DID number with an O8 code although I live in an 02 region. Does anyone know whether I can get this changed somehow?

Any info greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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Dazzled
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Re: Best Software For VoIP

Post by Dazzled » Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:52 pm

For xten, start here: http://www.exetel.com.au/files/softphone.pdf or downoad the full manual from http://www.counterpath.net/assets/files ... rGuide.pdf

Most usb phones are little more than a speaker and mike in a familar phone shape, and use the softphone to do most of the work. Skype is a proprietary protocol VoIP softphone.

Softphones are severely limited in practicality and capabilities, and you should consider getting an ATA to use with a standard telephone.

If your VoIP number was supplied with a naked plan, you should email Exetel. If you chose it yourself, just cancel it and get a Newcastle one, though if it is only going to be used for outward calls, it doesn't matter.

Edit: I went to Winco's site to get the phone manual, but the link there is dead. I picked up a manual from Sedna's site, which says that it is a Windows-only Skype-only model. http://www.sednacomputer.com/manual/SE-VOIP-P4K.PDF

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Re: Best Software For VoIP

Post by vk3xem » Thu Jul 02, 2009 4:27 pm

I would certainly recommend dumping the softphone, the resources it requires on a computer is ofter more than the capabilities of the computer especially when all the other applications are running.

An ATA or VoIP handset is the way to go. They are specifically designed for their purpose, along with setting priority for port 5060 on your modem and/or router will give you the best possible results.
The views I present are that of my own and NOT of any organisation I may belong to.

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